what to expect series

What to Expect Series: Logo Template

What to Expect Series: Logo Template - Vale Design

What to Expect Series is a series designed to remove confusion and anxiety for potential clients about starting a Brand Identity project with Vale Design. These posts will describe what your project will look like from initial client inquiry email to final file release. No more guesswork needed!


In our series we have discussed Onboarding your Brand Identity project, Client Questionnaire, Creating a Moodboard and the Design Phase. Now I would like for you to see the exact PDF page format you will receive for your Vale Design Logo Presentation.

Let's walk through the 8.5 inch x 11 inch Vale Design logo presentation template section by section.

Vale Design Logo Presentation Template

What to Expect Series: Logo Template - Vale Design

1. 2C = 2 color logo design

Examples: Black + Red. Gold + Gray. Navy + Blush Pink. Black + gradation of a color.

The first section you will see on your Vale Design Logo Presentation template is "2C" or "2 color." Typically logos will only use 2 to 3 colors. I try to keep my clients down to 2 colors. These colors will define the "primary brand colors." You only want to use 2 colors so that your consumers begin to recognize your brand through color recognition. Your 2 color logo is your main logo and should be used as a first choice whenever possible.

I also recommend only 2 colors for my clients due to potential print costs. Print jobs today will either be printed digitally (on a high quality laser printer like what a nice office would have) or on a traditional press (Pantone spot colors and then CMYK or 4 color printing at the end). Traditional presses can be very expensive. Most print jobs today are printed on digital printers. This keeps the cost down and they print 4 color CMYK. But again, I recommend 2 color for establishing brand color recognition.

Places where 2 color logo would be used:

• print collateral - business cards, packaging, labels, brochures, menus, mailers, flyers, etc.
• web design
• uniforms - hats, shirts, etc.
• signage - interior & exterior
• social media profile images


2. 1C = 1 color logo design

Examples: Black + a tint percentage of Black. Black. Navy. Red. Gradation of a color.

The second section will be "1C" or "1 color." This section will show you what your logo will look like in one color or one color plus a tint, or percentage of that color.

Places where 1 color logo would be used:

• ads - magazine or newspaper ad
• promotional pieces - pens, letter openers, can openers, etc.
• web design
• uniforms - hats, shirts, etc.
• signage - interior & exterior
• social media profile images


3. 1 inch - both 2C & 1C logo designs

The final section will show you the logo reduced down to 1 inch in both 2 color and 1 color versions. It is IMPERATIVE for me to show my clients what their potential logo would look like reduced down to 1 inch.

When you reduce a logo down to 1 inch, there may be design adjustments. The font will be the most important change when you reduce your logo down in size. Printers can only print a letterform so small. Typically, printers do not like to print below 5 pt type for legibility issues. Therefore, I never allow my clients to have a font that prints below 5 pt type. The layout may change according to the font size change.

Places where a 1 inch logo would be used:

• ads - magazine or newspaper ad
• promotional pieces - pens, letter openers, can openers, etc.
• uniforms - hats, shirts, etc.
• social media profile images


4. logo concept number & date

At the bottom of each logo template will be a copy block listing the logo concept presentation number for revision reference, Vale Design, your Business Name and the date. I use this for simple organization and for keeping all presentations in the correct order. Your design package may have multiple presentations.


There you have it! I want to show my clients how each logo will work in 2C, 1C and 1 inch so they are not surprised or upset when a logo layout needs to be adjusted for a different brand elements. All the approved logo layouts are included in the final Brand Style Guide PDF at the final file release.

If you would like to work together or have any additional questions about working with Vale Design, simply contact me!

 

What to Expect Series: Design Phase

WTESDesignPhaseSQ.jpg

What to Expect Series is a series designed to remove confusion and anxiety for potential clients about starting a Brand Identity project with Vale Design. These posts will describe what your project will look like from initial client inquiry email to final file release. No more guesswork needed!


In the What to Expect Series, we have discussed Onboarding your project, Client Questionnaire and Creating a Moodboard. Now we are really going to get into the heart of the project, the Design Phase.

The design phase will be the bulk of the time spent during your Brand Identity project. It is the most important phase. When you are creating a brand, you will create the logo first. (Find out the simple difference between a logo and a brand here.) The brand will be created around your final logo. I follow my standard procedure when it comes to creating a new logo.

1. Gather Design Direction

I gather design direction from the answers from the Client Questionnaire and the moodboard that was selected by the client. I always keep these 2 elements in front of me while I am designing. I want to make sure we stay true to the design direction that was chosen.

2. Brainstorm

ValeBrainstorm.jpg

Brainstorming is my favorite part of the design phase. It is where my most interesting ideas come from. I use a word association technique when I brainstorm. This technique allows me to discover some very creative out-of-the-box solutions. I will discuss my brainstorming techniques in greater detail in another post.

I also study the moodboard and see if there are elements that are repeated throughout the images. Maybe all the images have scroll work. Then I will definitely include some element of scroll work in your logo. Maybe all the images are upscale, classy and suggest another time period. Then I will use serif fonts (the ones with the feet) in your logo to suggest elegance, sophistication and timelessness. 

3. Pencil & Paper Sketch

Once I have some solid word association ideas for your logo, I move into the sketching phase. I always begin with pencil and paper. Sketching for me looks like mixing letter combinations from the first letters of your business name. Researching letterforms of different fonts that I feel might lead to powerful or beautiful, visual impact for your logo. I will gather imagery and shapes. I will trace images and simplify them down to look more like icons. I will thumbnail sketch logo ideas. I always jot notes down on the right side of the paper I am sketching on. This running column of ideas helps me keep brainstorming even as I am sketching. It might be random words, color combinations, different fonts to check out at a later date.

4. Digital Art

Once I have created 2 to 3 pages of logo sketches, or I feel I have exhausted my ideas, I will circle the logos I would like to move forward into Adobe Illustrator. Illustrator is the design program where I create digital artwork. Moving a logo solution into Illustrator is always a tricky and exciting step. Sometimes the logos do not work out and die onscreen. Sometimes the logos come alive and I get "the feeling" where I know I have just created your final logo!

Logos are created in Illustrator to produce the digital art formats that will be used for your brand across a range of platforms. If a magazine contact asks you for an .ai file, you will be ready!


The Vale Design design phase will be the bulk of time for your project, is crucial to your final brand design and is my favorite phase of the project. This is the phase where we design your ideal logo that will translate into your new brand look and feel for your business.

If you would like to work together or have any additional questions about working with Vale Design, simply contact me!